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Ultimaker 2 – Use 5v controlled fan to also get a 24v controlled fan.

As people might know, the Ultimaker 2/3 series machines are very sleek, minimalistic looking, with all wires, motors and electronics neatly hidden away.

This is nice from a visual perspective, but it does have some drawbacks in the form of overheating disaster waiting to happen.

This posts covers 2 seperate scenarioes which you can mix as you like:

  • Use the 5v controlled power for the small 25mm fan for the hotend heatsink to also controll a 24v radial fan to cool the electronics.
  • Use the 5v controlled power, as above, to controll a 24v fan for an E3D hotend and the same 24v radial fan as mentioned above.

Index

Goal

The Ulticontroller is getting rather hot when running, and it is enclosed in a tiny enclosure with no active ventilation. I wanted to rectify this.

Printable Coolboard Duct

My goal was to attach a controllable radial fan to blow into the electronics compartment. I found this nice Ultimaker 2 Coolboard Duct for Control Board Cooling on Youmagine, which you can download for free and print yourself. Seems they have started using my photos, but that’s ok 🙂

There are air ventilation holes in the end of the electronics compartment, which is perfect for our purpose.

Controllable fan

I did not want the fan to run at full speed whenever my printer was turned on though, due to the noise, so something had to be done to make it turn on and off automatically.

I thought about modifying the firmware, but I didn’t know the pin numbers on the controllerboard, or even if they were controllable. It would also be rather restrictive for many people, as they run original firmware.

This type of fan is called a radial fan, and is designed to push air through tight spaces.

How it works

I’m going to achieve my goals using a Mosfet control board (example, example), so we are not going to solder seperat small components together, but just wire things together combined with a few wire-connectors (Can do without if you absolutely have to).

Mosfets are the components turning your heaters and fans on and off, so we basically add an extra one to our machine.

I am using this model as I’ve had best general results with this.

We would normally control these functions using a seperat PIN and some code in firmware. As this option is not available to us, we are going to piggyback on the function allready setup for our 5v 25mm small fan blowing on the Hotend Heatsink. This one turns on and off at 40c, which suits our purpose superbly.

Bill Of Material

  • Radial Fan 50mm x 15mm
  • 1x DC control MOS FET switch control panel
  • 2x male and 1x female XH2.54 connector. Buy a box.
  • 2x female dupont connector + pins. You can use a male XH2.54 connector plug if you have to.
  • 8x male dupont pins. Can do without, but highly recommended.
  • Some heatshrink
  • Kapton tape or similar
  • 2x 35-40mm m3 screws if you use the printed Duct.

Prepare the wires

As you can see here, we are going to create 4x pieces of wires:

  1. Wire from Controller 5v connector to Mosfet control
    1. 5-6cm with male XH2.54 to 2x male dupont pins
  2. Wire from mosfet control to original 25mm fan Connector
    1. 10-11cm with female XH2.54 to 2x male dupont pins
  3. Wire from mosfet DC out to Radial fan connector
    1. 6-7cm with male XH2.54 to 2x male dupont pins
  4. Wire from Controller 24v power pins to Mosfet DC in
    1. 16-17cm with 2x female dupont connectors to 2x male dupont pins

Optional: Instead of #4 you can use the unused Controller FAN connector at the end of the controller.
8-10cm wire with male XH2.54 connector to 2x male dupont pins

Optional: Instead of the first 2 seperate wires you can create a combined Y wire, meaning 1 male XH2.54 connector to 1) 2x male dupont pins and 2) 1x male XH2.54 connector

Wire up

  1. Number 1 is the 5v connector on the Controller. This wire goes to the control in port on the Mosfet control board.
  2. Number 2 is the 24v output pin on the controller. Goes to DC in on the Mosfet Control board.

Here you can see the short wire from Mosfet Control board Control in to the original connector up to the 25mm fan. This just pass on the 5v.

I have an E3D on one of mine, and use a 24v fan for its’ heatsink. Just connect this short wire to the Mosfet Control board DC OUT insteaad, same as for the Radial fan.

I’ve used the printed parts from the E3D Ultimaker 2, 2+ Upgrade Conversion Kit for this E3D carriage.

Here you can see the wire from Mosfet Control board DC OUT to the Radial fan. It also shows the place we are going to stash the control board, but we need to prepare it a bit first.

Before putting the Mosfet Controller board into it’s hiding place, we must make sure there is no shorts going to happen. As you can see, I’ve simply wrapped Kapton tape around mine.

It’s not going to generate a lot of heat, so don’t worry about that.

Before wrapping Kapton around it, you should make sure the pins on the backside of the board doesn’t poke through. Use a small wirecutter to shorten them as much as you can.

Reinstall Controller shield

I’ve done this a lot, and thought I’d make a seperate section for it to make it easier to get it right the first time.

  1. First slide it gently down like photo 1. Make sure all cables are inside.
  2. When you have caught all wires inside it, you should tilt it like on photo 2 and make sure the “pin” next to the motor is correctly inserted into the hole in the frame.
  3. Now tilt the shield back and fix it in place.
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BLTouch on Duet Wifi & RepRapFirmware

The time has come to setup BLTouch on my system.

I’m going to use Duet WiFi + Duex5, but I’ll post details about using it without the Duex as well.

Since I do use Duex5 and because of other considerations explained in this blog-post, I’ve decided upon not following the pin selection most often mentioend other places. I do however try to explain my reasoning and how you can use it to customize your own setup.

Please let me know if you have comments or inputs. I do take all comments as a positve thing, also potential corrections to my writings 🙂

When I feel I have everything I need, I’ll boil down on this post and use it as a “how-to” for both duet3d wiki and instructables.com

Index

Physical overview

First a short explanation on how a BLTouch sensor works and what it is: The BLTouch sensor is in the category of Servo sensors, meaning it’s using a mechanical servo mechanism to raise and lower the metal pin to do the testing.

Quote from the maker: ANTCLABS(A&T)

  • BLTouch is an auto leveling sensor for 3D Printers based on open-source.
  • Simple, Smart, High-precision
  • It could work with any kinds of bed materials, such as glasses, woods, metals, and so on.

Probe Connector role

At first the Duet Wifi and RepRapFirmware didn’t support servos, but focused on other sensor types like their own IR-sensor.

It means the description on the WiKi can be a bit confusing for us non-electronical centric people as they talk a lot about using the Probe Sensor, which just doesn’t apply fully to the BLTouch Sensor. (To be honest I get more confused by reading this page, so don’t feel bad if you are like me!)

They have added a BLTouch section now though, which helps a lot. Thumbs up! 🙂

It means we can’t just use all the pins from the Probe connector as the sole connection on the Duet WiFi, but only use 2 of these pins in the Probe Connector, GND and IN, to register the actual signal from the BLTouch. We need to use PWM connector for the other 3 pins from the BLTouch.

The Probe Connector is the one to the right in the photo. Placed next to the LCD connector to the left of it.

The red wire is IN and black wire is GND

Note: You might notice the small 480Ω resistor crimped into the connector here. More on this later.

Using expansion PWM port for Servo

The 3 remaining wires from the BLTouch are there to control the Servo Pin inside the BLTouch.

Since we have a Duex board we are going to use 1 of the 5 ports labeled as “PWM” ports on the board itself, but listed as “Shared with servos” on Duex2/5 main features page.

When looking at the Wiring Diagram, the connectors are labeled as “PWM / Servos“.

Physical Connections

Lets start by looking at the 2 wires for the Probe Connector on the Duet Wifi/Ethernet.

2-Pins for Z signal

We are going to connect the 2 wires labeled Z (white) and GND (black) on the BLTouch and connect to the matching pin on Duet WiFi Probe Connector, as shown in the diagram.

Note: Your wires might be colored differently. Especially if you use a counterfit version like 3DTouch.
My version of the BLTouch is an old Classic version.

5v to 3.3v logic level conversion

The BLTouch is as default configuring using 5v logic. It means we have to make sure we set it up to run as 3.3v logic instead. Don’t worry about not grasping what 3.3v logic means, as it’s really not important to know what it is, only how we hook up our sensor.

If you have an old Classic BLTouch (as I do), you need to either solder or crimp in the included 480Ω (ohm) resistor between the 2 wires for the Probe Connector.

I crimped them into my connector. Mine came with a 480Ω and 10kΩ resistor.

I do not know why the 10kΩ was included.. anyone know?

If you have a new version of BLTouch with serial number, you just need to cut the solder away between 2 solder pads, as shown here:

3-Pins for Servo

The 3 left over wires on the BLTouch are GND (brown), Red (5v) and Orange (control signal)

If you do not own a Duex expansions port and instead use the pins on the Duet Wifi, you connect as shown on this diagram:

You can use a different Heater-pin, just make the necessary adjustment in your configurations.

  • GND ( G, Brown) to pin 2 on Duet WiFi
  • 5v (5v, Red) to pin 1 on Duet WiFi
  • Orange (S, Control signal) to pin 31

Some info on the Duet Wiki where they use pin 8 instead of my 31. They are also using different colors than my BLTouch, so be sure to check on your own model!

Note on below wire colors: I did not have any brown (used black) or orange (used white) cables, so go by the labels near the connectors, or remember my choices.

The difference between Pin 8 and Pin 31, is how Pin8 is assigned Heater 3 and Pin31 is assigned Heater 7. I picked the last available, in case I later wanted to actually use Heater 3 as a heater. I’m never going to use 7 heaters, and Heater 7 connector also made for nicer wiring in my case 🙂

Note: It can be confusing how the numbering on PWM# and E# doesn’t follow each other. Reason for this is, how the Heater numbers (E) starts with E0 and E1 located on main Duet WiFi board, while the PWM ports are either starts with PWM1 or PWM0 is somewhere not known to me.

The above diagram is a small part I made out of the full diagram.

Firmware Configuration

It’s time to configure our firmware in order to use the BLTouch sensor we just connected. There is some good information on the Connecting a Z probe – BLTouch on the Duet3d wiki.

Disable heater

As shown in the warning in the above diagram, the PWM channels are shared with the heaters, so we need to disable the relevant heater.

We are using the PWM_5 connector, which is the 7th Heater.

We disable it using the M307 Gcode command and setting A, D and C to -1 in our Heaters section in Config.g file. Setting them to -1 means they are disabled.

M307 H7 A-1 C-1 D-1

Note: change H7 to whatever heater you need to disable according to how you choose to wire it up.

RepRapFirmware 1.16 and later allow the PID controller for a heater to be disabled by setting the A, C and D parameters to -1. This frees up the corresponding heater control pin for use as a general purpose I/O pin.

Set Servo Position

Now we need to configure the position of our Servo Pin, which we do using the M280 Gcode command.

Deploy Probe

In order to do so, we put the following into our deployprobe.g file. If you do not have this file, you just hit New File in the System Editor where all the other config files are located and create it.

Insert the following into the file, where the P-number corresponds to our H-number above.

M280 P7 S10

S10 is the “angle” the PIN is put in to engage. You can read more and also see a table of most of the expansion pins. When dealing with BLTouch the engaged position is at angle 10.

Note: In the Duet wiki it is listed to include a Invert parameter: I1 at the end as well, but mine doesn’t work when used.

Retract Probe

Next we need to configure how we retract the Servo Pin in the BLTouch. These settings are configured in the retractprobe.g file. Create it the same way as before if you don’t have this file.

M280 P7 S90

Once again, the P-number corresponds to our H-number while S defines the “angle” to put the probe into. When dealing with BLTouch the retracted position is at angle 90.

Note: In the Duet wiki it is listed to include a Invert parameter: I1 at the end as well, but mine doesn’t work when used.

Configure Endstop Section

Set Z-Probe type

Now we need to setup the Probe Type to Type 5 in our Endstop section in the config.g file using the M558 command.

P5 (from RepRapFirmware 1.14) selects a switch (normally closed) for bed probing between In and Gnd pins of the Z-probe connector (Duet 0.8.5 and Duet WiFi).

Settings legend/explanation:

Overview of what the different parameters means and do:

  • P# = Mode/Type of probe – P5 is for bed probing between In and Gnd pins of the Z-probe connector.
  • XYZ# = 1 use probe for this axis. 0 do not use probe for this axis
  • H# = Dive Height of the Servo pin. 5mm is normal for BLTouch
  • F# = Feed Rate mm/min
  • T# = Travel speed to and between probe points (mm/min)

It all means that we insert the follow line for our new Z-Probe, defining the Type and usage settings.

M558 P5 X0 Y0 Z1 H5 F120 T6000 ; Set Z Probe to type Switch or Digital output where Z probe connector is used. Used for z only.;

  • Put it in the Endstop section in config.g file:

Set or Report Current Probe status

Next we need to setup how the Probe behaves, using the G31 command.

Settings legend/explanations

  • Z# = Trigger height. 1.5mm is normal for BlTouch
  • P# = Trigger value. 25-100. Lower it if nothing happens.
  • XY# = Placement of probe relative to your nozzle. Called offset. In mm.

It means we set trigger value to 50 (don’t worry if it means nothing to you), define where the probe is placed in realtion to our nozzle and the trigger height of the Probe Pin.

The Z value is the Z-offset. Used to tune the distance between trigger location and nozzle. Higher offset value and you get the nozzle closer to bed.

G31 P50 X-25 Y38 Z1.5; Set Z probe trigger value, offset and trigger height

  • This line is also placed in the Endstop section in the config.g file.
  • Just place it under the above M558 line.

G32: Probe Z and calculate Z plane

The G32 Gcode Command can be used to define 3 or more probe points. I am only using mine as a Z-min endstop with 1 point, so not going to use this feature for now.

Links

Relevant Gcode commands:

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Duex5 – Use build in 12v switching regulator on 24v system

Index

Use Duex5 to get 12v

As far as I know the Duex5 (also in Duex2) is the only Controller or Expansions -board for 3D Printers with build-in 12v switching regulator, which means you can easily get 12v even if you use a higher voltage to power your machine (VIN Power – opens Duet3d Glossary) without having to restort to various step-down modules lying around in or outside your printer creating potential for shorts and other errors.

Jumper Settings

In order to activate this 12v switching we need to:

  1. Put a jumper on the pins marked with nr. 1
  2. Check the FAN jumper nr. 2 is placed on the 12v position
  3. I’m going to use the FAN3 Connector marked with nr. 3 for my LEDs

In case you have difficulty seeing the colors as me, being colorblind, the + wire is to the right side of the 2-pin connector, and – wire on the left side.

Image is part of the original conenctions diagram on Duet3D wiki.

You can also see the full diagram here:

Configure LED in firmware

We really just need to open the Config.g file and insert a small line under the other fans in our FAN section, like this:

M106 P3 S1; Set fan 3 value for our LED to on.

It really just put FAN connector 3 on full power.

Further customization options

We can put the power to the LEDs on half (dimming it) by setting S to 0.5 instead of 1, or use the 0-255 range if that’s more to your liking.

It also means you can control it using Gcodes to do different things like turning LED on when a print starts and turn it off when a print job ends or what ever you like.

All done

Here you can see the new jumper on nr 1, set jumper on nr 2 and our LED connector on nr. 3

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BeTrue3D Printer build part 9 – LEDs – 12v from 24v Duex5

Finishing our LED installation

We previously installed front LEDs, including an on/off rocker.

Recap:

Back then, I only had 12v LED strips and as I use 24v on this system, I needed to get 12v from somewhere.

In order to test it worked, I used a small fixed 24v to 12v step-down buck-converter and used some double-sided tape to stick it in place below the Duex5 as shown here:

Index

Use Duex5 to get 12v

As far as I know the Duex5 (also in Duex2) is the only Controller or Expansions -board for 3D Printers with build-in 12v switching regulator, which means you can easily get 12v even if you use a higher voltage to power your machine (VIN Power – opens Duet3d Glossary)

In order to activate this 12v switching we need to:

  1. Put a jumper on the pins marked with nr. 1
  2. Check the FAN jumper nr. 2 is placed on the 12v position
  3. I’m going to use the FAN3 Connector marked with nr. 3 for my LEDs

In case you have difficulty seeing the colors, the + wire is to the right side of the 2-pin connector, and – wire on the left side.

Image is part of the original conenctions diagram on Duet3D wiki.

You can also see the full diagram here:

Configure LED in firmware

We really just need to open the Config.g file and insert a small line under the other fans in our FAN section, like this:

M106 P3 S1; Set fan 3 value for our LED to on.

It really just put FAN connector 3 on full power. We can put it on half power by setting S to 0.5 instead of 1, or use the 0-255 range if that’s more to your liking.

It also means you can control it using Gcodes to do different things like turning LED on when a print starts and turn it off when a print job ends or what ever you like.

All done

Here you can see the new jumper on nr 1, set jumper on nr 2 and our LED connector on nr. 3

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Lets build an Ultimaker 2+ Extended clone – Part 5 – Lets buy stuff 3 – DIY – Motors, LEDs and more

In our previous blog-post series, we focused on buying stuff premade.

This post will focus on getting the proper wires, connectors, leds and motors to put our own parts together, and hopefully save some money along the way 🙂

The big saving is going to show if you like to tinker with stuff, as you’ll have bought yourself a nice cache of spare-parts for this and other projects.

You need a soldering iron for this and some basic tools. It might be usefull to buy an actual crimping tool, but it’s not mandatory.

 Index

LEDs for front lightning

In the Ultimaker 2 printers we have LED strips on the inside of the front sides and top.

It’s basically just 3 strips of 24v bright white leds with wires attached between them, and a wire with a 2-pin Molex kk connector going down to the controller.

 

So, first we buy a roll of 24v bright white leds. They cost $5-10 depending on length

Links

Roll for wires

Next we need to get some wires. I rather like to buy 1m rolls of multicolored wires from RobotDigg. 1M doesn’t sound like much, but there are 30-40 wires of 1m each in a roll, and it’s very usefull to get thme like this.

Links

Price is from $1.8+ depending on how much you buy.

  • You need 1 roll of the black-red bundle.
  • If you like to make other projects, I recommend buying one or both of the 3-color and 5-color rolls as well.
  • We’ll look at wires for motors elsewhere on Aliexpress.

Connector(s)

We are going to buy a box of connectors. These will come in very handy for any number of projects.

Price at $3.40

Heatshrink

We need some heatshrink to put onto our parts, where we solder things together.

I can recommend buying both a set of black and one of red pieces, but 1 color is going to work fine.

If you want it just right, you need a white set as well, for the front LEDs, allthough you can’t see these when done.

Price $2.4-$5ish

Make it

I used 3x 30cm LED strips, but these lengths are determined by the LED roll you buy, as they can be split up in different lengths.

Measure strips and wires.

Solder and put on heatshrink

Remember to slide on heatshrink before you solder both ends of the short wires – speaking from experience, hehe.

Testing and installation

Test the wires using a 24v source.

You also MUST clean up the inner face of the front-panel using Acetone or the LED strips will come loose.

Price compare

If you bought pre-made it would cost you $10

If you bought the parts and made yourself, it would cost:

Leds 5m $5.84
Connectors 50 sets $2.4
Wires 40m $1.8
Heatshrink – much 2.4
DIY + spares $12.44

Motors

We need 3 motors for XY and Extruder + a motor with build in leadscrew for Z.

We need 67cm of wires on your motors and appropriate connectors.

Links and price

The leadscrew on Z-motor is around 36cm long. Do not buy a motor and loose leadscrew. You are loosing a lot of Z-height and it’s not as good. Especially if you use a flexible coupler.

I have only listed Robotdigg as they have cheaper motors and we are going to buy wires and stuff from them as well.

But remember to factor in the shipping costs when you decide on where to buy.

  • Buy 350mm linear stepper from Robotdigg at $34
  • XY and Extruder 42HS40-1704 at $6.40 each = $19.2
  • XYE Motors comes with 1m wires and correct plugs (not entirely sure of Z connector, but you are going to get one when buying endstops below)

Adjust motors axels

One draw-back is that you need to shorten up the axels of the motors or they are going to hit the rear and side respectively.

You need to twist the cable pairs. First  twist red/blue and black/green, and then twist the resulting 2 bundles.

Price compare

Premade set $99
DIY set $53,2

Endstops

We are going to need 3 endstops, also known as a Limit Switch for our X-min, Y-max and Z max.

The Z-max endstop has a short arm and the other two needs to have long arms.

They are all configured as NO (Normally Open) in original firmware. This means the wires is connected as shown on the photo.

Wire colors, blue, red and black are in place in order to know what’s what.

Remember the the lengths of the wires for our Extended is not the same as in the pdf files.

There is a single 2-pin HX2.54 connector on each endstop wire.

 

Links and Price

Expect to pay around $0.2-0.3 for each limit switch. Search around for prices if you like. You might want to find a set of 10 if you want to have some spares, or some for other projects.

Price compare

  • Premade $7-14 for a set
  • DIY set costs $3.63 and you’ll have a lot of spares.

Wireharness from controller to carriage

The Wireharness consists of the wires from carriage (carriage is the assembly for hotend and fans) to controller. Since the wires from Heater Cartridge and PT100 temperature sensor runs straight down to the controller on their own, the Wireharness is really only for the small Heatsink fan and the 2x cooler fans.

If you want the right colors you should buy 1 more roll of wires from Robotdigg. I’d replace the blue one with a white wire, as the blue wire isn’t included in any of the wire bundles.

Links and Price

  • Premade $10
  • 1 roll of 5 color wires (50m) at $1.8
  • Connectors from LEDs and Endstops.
  • Heatshrink from LEDs

The wireharness you buy has 3 wire-sets in it, buy one of these are not used. I do not know what was intended here. The red/brown pair is unused.

Phto above shows the one I made for this project.

The Green/Yellow is for the 12v fans. When put in series they each get 12v from our 24v system.

Total Price compare

I’ve picked the price in the middle of an eventual price-range.

Remember several of the pieces from LEDs are used for the other Items.

Item Premade DIY
LEDs  $10  $12,44
Motors  $95  $53,2
Endstops  $10,5  $3,63
Wireharness  $10  $1,8
Total $125,5  71,07

You save $53,93 on just this project by doing a bit of DIY!

Savings on future projects are going to be bigger as you now have a cache of usefull items 🙂

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Lets build an Ultimaker 2+ Extended clone – Part 4 – Lets buy stuff 2 – Motors, LEDs and more…

This part is about buying all the cables, leds and connector stuff premade to use in our Ultimaker 2+ Extended clone build.

Intro

It’s been under way a bit longer than I would have liked, but as always, it is not as easy to decide what to include or not, and how to put it together. At first I had the Buy all and DIY part put together, but it seriously hampered ease of use and readability (confusing), so spent some extra time splitting the two things up. Hope you like it!

Index

LEDs for front lightning

In the Ultimaker 2 printers we have LED strips on the inside of the front sides and top.

It’s basically just 3 strips of 24v bright white leds with wires attached between them, and a wire with a 2-pin Molex kk connector going down to the controller.

Links and price

Expect to pay around $10

Motors or long wires with connectors

You can either buy a package of motors from Aliexpress or maybe you have some motors and just need the motor with 35-40cm lead-screw on it.

You need 67cm of wires on your motors.

This can be solved in 2 ways depending on your motors:

  1. Buy the motors with appropriate length of wires and connectors (note: link is to non-extended pdf. Wires must be 67cm and 57cm respectively)
  2. Buy wires to use on your existing/other motors.

Links and price

The leadscrew on Z-motor is around 36cm long.

Do not buy a motor and loose leadscrew. You are loosing a lot of Z-height and it’s not as good. Especially if you use a flexible coupler.

Expect to pay $90-100 if you buy the motors as a bundle on Aliexpress.

I have listed Robotdigg as they have cheaper motors and lots of other nice items. But remember to factor in the shipping costs!

If you buy or use other motors

If you allready have or buy other motors for XY you must check these requirments:

  • Holding torque 4kg-cm or more
  • Motor length 40mm or it can’t fit behind the motor covers
  • Inductance MAX 4mH. Under 3mH is better. Higher = slower reaction.
  • Max 2amp. If you get higher amp you can’t take advantage of it’s specifications.

The above motor would be fine for Extruder as well.

The extruder motor can be 48mm deep/long if you have one of these. The additional power should not be needed as we use Titan Extruder

I’m using 17HS4401N motors for all my XY and extruders on all printers as I bought a bunch of them a few years ago. Was lucky and got some nice motors.

Endstops

We are going to need 3 endstops, also known as a Limit Switch for our X-min, Y-max and Z max.

The Z-max endstop has a short arm and the other two needs to have long arms.

They are all configured as NO (Normally Open) in original firmware.

Wire colors, blue, red and black are in place in order to know what’s what. Remember the the lengths of the wires for our Extended is not the same as in the pdf files. XY wires should be 65cm and Z around 15cm

There is a single 2-pin HX2.54 connector on each endstop wire.

Links and Price

Expect to pay $7-14 for a set

Wireharness from controller to carriage

The Wireharness consists of the wires from carriage (carriage is the assembly for hotend and fans) to controller.

Since the wires from Heater Cartridge and PT100 temperature sensor runs straight down to the controller on their own, the Wireharness is really only for the small Heatsink fan and the 2x cooler fans.

The wireharness you buy has 3 wire-sets in it, buy one of these are not used. I do not know what was intended here. The red/brown pair is unused.

Photo above shows the one I made for this project, which does not have the last unused pair in it

The Green/Yellow is for the 12v fans. When put in series they each get 12v from our 24v system.

Links and Price

Expect to pay $10

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Spot bent 8mm rod in Ultimaker 2

Spotted irregular movement of my back slider, in my newly build Ultimaker 2+ Extended and thought I’d share how to check your rods.

How to check if your rods are straight.

They look straight and feel straight, but when mounted it is easy to see they if they are not.

Simply place the slider in the middle of the rod you want to check. Move the carriage back and forth.
The slider should be still. No movement at all.
As you can see, this slider moves up and down as I move the carriage back and forth, so it needs to be discarded.

If you can’t see how the slider moves up and down, then try focusing on the belts connecting to the slider.